The Dark Side of Dementia Care

You might expect the federal government to oversee and regulate assisted living facilities. However, since Medicare and Medicaid usually do not pay for stays at these facilities, there is no federal protection for the residents. When you consider how many assisted living centers now claim to offer dementia and memory care, you can see the brewing of a perfect storm. Highly vulnerable people are at the mercy of unregulated facilities. If you have a loved one in an assisted living center, you need to know about the dark side of dementia care.

People who live in nursing homes have some protections through federal legislation. The government imposes strict rules on nursing homes that receive funding from Medicare or Medicaid. Most assisted living centers are private pay, so the federal government cannot regulate them.

Some states have regulations designed to protect people in long-term care facilities. These states are discovering appalling conditions at many assisted living centers that advertise dementia care. Let’s be clear – there are wonderful facilities that provide fantastic dementia care. The problem is, a great number of for-profit facilities have sprung up quickly, without enough focus on the best interests of the residents.

The Reasons for Unacceptable Conditions at Dementia Care Facilities

The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia has risen dramatically over the last 20 years. Businesses all over the nation have seized on this opportunity to make a profit, by providing specialized care services. The problem is, many of these facilities do not deliver the promised level of care and security for these residents.

Long-term care can cost $5,000 to $7,000 a month or more. Most of the facility employees get paid low wages, particularly the workers who provide the lion’s share of the hands-on care of residents. To increase profits, the corporations that own and run these facilities often have high patient-to-staff ratios. In short, the centers are understaffed, and the workers are underpaid. Neither of those factors is conducive to the safe, attentive, nurturing environment that a person with dementia needs.

A Climate of Not Caring

Even when a state has regulations for assisted living centers, the punishments show little value for the well-being and lives of the elderly. For example, a 90-year-old lady with dementia lived in an assisted living facility in South Carolina. When she wandered away from the center one night, her absence went unnoticed for seven hours. By the time someone finally realized she was missing, she had already met a gory death.

An alligator in the pond next to the center killed and partially ate her. Her granddaughter was one of the first people to find the remains of the body. A year later, the state cited the facility for more than 10 violations involving patient safety, including not maintaining adequate numbers of staff and failing to perform nightly checks of residents. The state imposed a fine of $6,400.

Long-term care ombudsmen across the U.S. say that many facilities use psychotropic drugs as chemical restraints, instead of providing the quality care the residents need and for which they are paying thousands of dollars every month. The staff members often do not have training in dementia care, but even in states with a training requirement, industry experts say the regulations get ignored.

Every state makes its own regulations. Be sure to talk with an elder law attorney near you to find out how your state might differ from the general law of this article.

References:

Huffpost. “Dementia Care Is A Lucrative Business. Its Breakneck Growth Is Costing Patients’ Safety.” (accessed November 8, 2019) https://www.huffpost.com/entry/assisted-living-dementia-injuries_b_5c1d6f88e4b04aa0a171b895