More Reasons Why Everyone Should Have a Will

Most people aren’t going to have a large number of strangers show up after they die who pretend to be relatives, says the article “Here’s why you don’t want to die without leaving a will” from Arizona Central. However, there are many other reasons to have a will. In Arizona, an estate creditor can step in and become your personal representative after death, if you haven’t designated someone to administer your estate and your family members don’t step up to be involved.

Are you still not convinced? Without a will, you have no say in who inherits your money and possessions, which will be distributed according to the laws of your state.

Here are some tips to help get your estate plan started:

Work with an estate planning attorney. Using an attorney provides accountability, ensures that your wishes are reflected in the estate plan and makes sure that your will is deemed valid by the court. All too often, online documents are found to be deficient, declared invalid and the family is left with the laws of the state.

Name an executor. Your will should include the name of an executor, who will be responsible for handling your financial affairs after you die. She will manage your assets, identify what bills need to be paid, file state and federal tax returns and keep records of anything done on behalf of your estate.

Keep your will in a safe location. Make sure your executor has a copy and knows where it is. Tell your family where it is.

Don’t forget a residuary clause. If you forget to include any assets, a residuary clause will name someone who will receive them.

Don’t forget other important documents. That means a power of attorney and an advance directive. The advance directive spells out what kind of medical treatment you would want, if you are unable to communicate. Power of attorney gives a person you name the authority to act on your behalf.

What if my family fights a lot? Your best bet will be to name a private fiduciary to act as your personal representative. That way, no one can be accused of playing favorites, and a family history of sibling rivalry won’t undermine your wishes.

Make an appointment with a local estate planning attorney, who knows the laws of your state and can work with you to create an estate plan designed for your specific family situation. Both you and your family will enjoy the peace of mind of knowing that you are prepared for the future.

Reference: Arizona Central (June 21, 2019) “Here’s why you don’t want to die without leaving a will”

Why You Need a Last Will and Testament

A will and testament is the document that allows you to describe how you want your belongings and assets to be distributed after you die. It’s different than a “living will,” explains The Daily Sentinel, in the article “It’s important to have a Last Will and Testament.” A living will is a document used to detail how someone wants their end of life matters conducted.

In Colorado and some other states, the Living Will is referred to as an Advance Directive, which helps to avoid some confusion between what it accomplishes and the tasks of the will.

The will is also the document used to name the person who will be the personal representative, often referred to as the “executor”, to carry out the directions in the will.

When there’s no will, there is much more work to settle an estate. The distribution plan is determined by the laws of the state. It is not likely to be what the person had in mind, but by then, it is too late.

Every parent needs a will, because it is used to name a guardian for minor children or a child with special needs. This is not a decision that can be left to the law. There is no automatic solution based on state law, like there is for assets and belongings.

If there is a disagreement about who should care for the dependents, or how the assets should be used to care for the dependents, the only solution is to go to court and have the court decide what is in the children’s best interests. The time, expense and stress on the family is easily avoided, simply by having a properly prepared will.

There are occasionally questions about whether a general or special power of attorney can be used to name a person to handle affairs when someone dies. This is not true. The authority given to a person in a power of attorney automatically and legally terminates, when the person who gave that authority to another person has died.

Several years ago, a widow was preparing to create a will, but never did. She had no surviving parents or siblings, but she did have a son. She probably thought that the law would give him all her assets automatically.

Unfortunately, after the woman died, it was learned that the “son” was an informally adopted son who had never been legally adopted. According to the laws of the state, he had no legal right to her estate. She could have had a will prepared and he would have inherited everything. However, because she had no will, distant relatives who she did not even know, were the recipients of her estate.

This example may be a little extreme, but it is not uncommon. Many unexpected things occur when there is no estate plan, or an estate plan is prepared by an inexperienced person using a form they found online or at the local library.

Reference: The Daily Sentinel (June 1, 2019) “It’s important to have a Last Will and Testament”

What Does ‘Getting Your Affairs in Order’ Really Mean?

That “something” that happens that no one wants to come out and say is that you are either incapacitated by a serious illness or injury or the ultimate ‘something,’ which is death. There are steps you can take that will help your family and loved ones, so they have the information they need and can help you, says Catching Health’s article “Getting your affairs in order.”

Start with the concept of incapacity, which is an important part of estate planning. Who would you want to speak on your behalf? Would that person be the same one you would want to make important financial decisions, pay bills and handle your personal affairs? Does your family know what your wishes are, or do you know what your parent’s wishes are?

Financial Power of Attorney. Someone needs to be able to pay your bills and handle financial matters. That person is named in a Financial Power of Attorney, and they become your agent. Without an agent, your family will have to go to court and get a conservatorship. This takes time and money. It also brings in court involvement into your life and adds another layer of stress and expense.

It’s important to name someone who you trust implicitly and whose financial savvy you trust. Talk with the person you have in mind first and make sure they are comfortable taking on this responsibility. There may be other family members who will not agree with your decisions, or your agent’s decisions. They’ll have to be able to stick to the course in the face of disagreements.

Medical Power of Attorney. The Medical Power of Attorney is used when end-of-life care decisions must be made. This is usually when someone is in a persistent vegetative state, has a terminal illness or is in an irreversible coma. Be cautious: sometimes people want to appoint all their children to make health care decisions. When there are disputes, the doctor ends up having to make the decision. The doctor does not want to be a mediator. One person needs to be the spokesperson for you.

Health Care Directive or Living Will. The name of these documents and what they serve to accomplish does vary from state to state, so speak with an estate planning attorney in your state to determine exactly what it is that you need.

Health Care Proxy. This is the health care agent who makes medical decisions on your behalf, when you can no longer do so. In Maine, that’s a health care advance directive. The document should be given to the named person for easy access. It should also be given to doctors and medical providers.

DNR, or Do Not Resuscitate Order. This is a document that says that if your heart has stopped working or if you stop breathing, not to bring you back to life. When an ambulance arrives and the EMT asked for this document, it’s because they need to know what your wishes are. Some folks put them on the fridge or in a folder where an aide or family member can find them easily. If you are in cardiac arrest and the DNR is with a family member who is driving from another state to get to you, the EMT is bound by law to revive you. You need to have that on hand, if that is your wish.

How Much Should You Tell Your Kids? While it’s really up to you as to how much you want to share with your kids, the more they know, the more they can help in an emergency. Some seniors bring their kids with them to the estate planning attorney’s office, but some prefer to keep everything under wraps. At the very least, the children need to know where the important documents are, and have contact information for the estate planning attorney, the accountant and the financial advisor. Many people create a binder with all of their important documents, so there are no delays caused in healthcare decisions.

Reference: Catching Health (May 28, 2019) “Getting your affairs in order.”