How Will Marriage Impact My Savings for Retirement?

New research from Boston College’s Center for Retirement Research has analyzed individuals’ contributions to a 401(k) plan, before and after marriage.

“Millennials marry later than previous generations. Since marriage is a major life milestone that often marks a line between youth and adulthood, a logical question is how this delay affects retirement saving,” the report states.

Think Advisor says in its April article, “Do People Save More in Their 401(k)s After They Marry?” that at age 30, only 41% of millennials were married, compared with 59% for the late baby boomers.

The report looked at data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation linked to W-2 records on defined contribution plan deferrals, to determine the extent to which marriage affects retirement savings.

The results of the analysis show that people increase both their participation in and their contributions to 401(k) plans after marriage.

In terms of participation, men respond a bit more after marriage than women. The research shows that men have lower participation rates than women before marriage, but they wind up at the same level once married.

After marriage, women increase their contribution rate by an average of 0.8%, compared to only 0.3% for men, according to the research.

Following these results, the research then looks at what this means, if the trend toward later marriage continues. To do this, the research looks at how much retirement wealth accrued in 401(k) plans by age 65 would have been impacted, if men and women married later than they do now.

The analysis assumes a five-year delay in marriage, which is based on the approximate increase that occurred between baby boomers and millennials.

The analysis finds that the effect of delay, while statistically significant in the regression, is small—a 3.1% decline in accumulated assets for men and a 3.4% decline for women.

“While the delay in marriage may be problematic for some forms of savings—delaying homeownership for example—it seems unlikely to make a large dent in retirement savings,” the report states.

Reference: Think Advisor (April 23, 2019) “Do People Save More in Their 401(k)s After They Marry?”

What is a Transfer on Death (TOD) Account?

Most married couples share a bank account from which either spouse can write checks and add or withdraw funds without approval from the other. When one spouse dies, the other owns the account. The dead spouse’s will can’t change that.

This account is wholly owned by both spouses while they’re both alive. As a result, a creditor of one spouse could make a claim against the entire account, without any approval or say from the other spouse. Either spouse could also withdraw all the money in the account and not tell the other. This basic joint account offers a right of survivorship, but joint account holders can designate who gets the funds, after the second person dies.

Kiplinger’s recent article, “How Transfer-on-Death Accounts Can Fit Into Your Estate Planning,” explains that the answer is transfer on death (TOD) accounts (also known as Totten trusts, in-trust-for accounts, and payable-on-death accounts).

In some states, this type of account can allow a TOD beneficiary to receive an auto, house, or even investment accounts. However, retirement accounts, like IRAs, Roth IRAs, and employer plans, aren’t eligible. They’re controlled by federal laws that have specific rules for designated beneficiaries.

After a decedent’s death, taking control of the account is a simple process. What is typically required, is to provide the death certificate and a picture ID to the account custodian. Because TOD accounts are still part of the decedent’s estate (although not the probate estate that the will establishes), they may be subject to income, estate, and/or inheritance tax. TOD accounts are also not out of reach for the decedent’s creditors or other relatives.

Account custodians (such as financial institutions) are often cautious, because they may face liability if they pay to the wrong person or don’t offer an opportunity for the government, creditors, or the probate court to claim account funds. Some states allow the beneficiary to take over that responsibility, by signing an affidavit. The bank will then release the funds, and the liability shifts to the beneficiary.

If you’re a TOD account owner, you should update your account beneficiaries and make certain that you coordinate your last will and testament and TOD agreements, according to your intentions. If you fail to do so, you could unintentionally add more beneficiaries to your will and not update your TOD account. This would accidentally disinherit those beneficiaries from full shares in the estate, creating probate issues.

TOD joint account owners should also consider that the surviving co-owner has full authority to change the account beneficiaries. This means that individuals whom the decedent owner may have intended to benefit from the TOD account (and who were purposefully left out of the Last Will) could be excluded.

If the decedent’s will doesn’t rely on TOD account planning, and the account lacks a beneficiary, state law will govern the distribution of the estate, including that TOD account. In many states, intestacy laws provide for spouses and distant relatives and exclude any other unrelated parties. This means that the TOD account owner’s desire to give the account funds to specific beneficiaries or their descendants would be thwarted.

Ask an experienced estate planning attorney, if a TOD account is suitable to your needs and make sure that it coordinates with your overall estate plan.

Reference: Kiplinger (March 18, 2019) “How Transfer-on-Death Accounts Can Fit Into Your Estate Planning”

Are You Behind in Your Retirement Saving?

Can you believe that almost half (48%) of American households over the age of 55 still have no retirement savings? Even so, it’s better than previous years, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

CNBC’s article, “These people are on the verge of retiring—and they have nothing saved,” says that the congressional watchdog group based its conclusions on an analysis of the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

In 2013, roughly 52% of households over age 55 had zero saved for retirement. While the over-55 crowd may have a big savings shortfall to make up, there are steps they can take. Let’s look at what they need to do.

Catch up on contributions to retirement plans: Workers can defer up to $19,000 in a 401(k) plan at work. Those employees who are over 50, can save an extra $6,000. Older savers can also sock away more money in an IRA, since the contribution limit for IRAs is $6,000 in 2019. people who are 50 and up, can save an additional $1,000.

Increase the funds in your health savings account: If you’re still working and have a high-deductible health plan at work, you most likely have access to a health savings account or HSA. HSA’s have a triple tax advantage: (i) you contribute money on a pretax or tax-deductible basis; (ii) your savings will accumulate tax-free; and (iii) you can take tax-free withdrawals to pay for qualified medical expenses. In 2019, participants with self-only health insurance can contribute $3,500. Those with family plans can save $7,000. Account holders age 55 and older can save an extra $1,000 in an HSA.

However, remember that when you’re enrolled in Medicare, you can no longer contribute to your HSA. However, you can use those funds to cover health-care costs in retirement.

Work a little longer and generate income: You could earn money from a part-time job to increase your income and ramp up your retirement savings.

If you get a raise, throw most of it into your savings account. If you get a raise to your pay at work, save two-thirds of it. Increase your 401(k) deferrals, so that you’re saving more of that pay increase.

Living on less than you make, is something that many people don’t learn until late in life—but as long as you are working, you can save.

Reference: CNBC (April 5, 2019) “These people are on the verge of retiring —and they have nothing saved”

When Should I Start My Estate Planning?

Only 42% of Americans have a will or other estate planning documents, according to a 2017 Caring.com study. Among parents of children under 18, only 36% have created a will.

USA Today’s recent article, “Estate planning: 6 steps to ensure your family is financially ready for when you die,” explains that if you die without a will, state laws will decide what happens to your property or who should be legally responsible for minor children. That might be OK in some circumstances, but in others, a grandchild with special needs might not receive the resources you want him to have, or an estranged family member might get your house.

For some reason, people believe that if they don’t do anything, things will “work out.” They often do not. Here is what you should consider:

Create a will. This document states who should get your money and possessions, as well as who would become a guardian to your minor children, if both parents die.

A living will. This legal document states what medical procedures you want or don’t want, if you’re incapacitated and can’t speak for yourself, such as whether to continue life-sustaining treatment. Powers of attorney let you appoint someone you trust to make legal, financial and health care decisions for you, if you are unable.

Trust. This is a legal entity that holds any property you want to leave to your beneficiaries. With a trust, your family won’t have to go through probate. Trusts also let you to set up instructions for how and when property is distributed. A trustee will manage the trust. Make sure you let people know, when you’ve designated them as a trustee. Name a secondary trustee, in case the primary trustee cannot or will not serve.

Beneficiaries. If you have investment accounts and retirement plans like a 401(k), make certain that the individual you’ve listed as the beneficiary is the person you want to receive those funds.  Remember to appoint a contingency or secondary beneficiary, just in case.

Work with an experienced attorney. Estate planning can be complicated, so get some professional legal help.

End-of-life planning isn’t really fun, but it’s necessary, if you want to have full control over your life and your assets.

Reference: USA Today (April 1, 2019) “Estate planning: 6 steps to ensure your family is financially ready for when you die”

How Do I Make the Right Estate Planning Moves When I Divorce?

The Journal Enterprise explains in its recent article, “5 Estate Planning Moves If You Are Getting Divorced,” that the following tips will help you get your plans in order, so your final wishes will be carried out later.

Medical Power of Attorney. This is also called a healthcare proxy. This person is named to make decisions on your medical care, if you’re ill or injured and can’t state your medical care decisions. Unless you make the change, your ex-spouse will have this right.

Financial Power of Attorney. Like a healthcare proxy, this is someone you select to take charge, if you become incapacitated. This person has authority over your financial decisions, and it means they have the authority to pay your bills, access your bank and investment accounts, collect and cash your paychecks and make financial decisions for you. You want to be certain that your assets are protected, and your financial obligations are met, while you’re unable to act on your own behalf. Most people name a spouse, but if you get divorced and don’t switch this designation, your spouse will still be your financial power of attorney and will retain access to your finances.

Create a List of Things to Change After Your Divorce. A divorce can freeze some assets and accounts, which remains in effect until it’s finalized. Therefore, you won’t be able to change the beneficiary on life insurance policies, pensions and other types of accounts. Ask your estate planning attorney to find out exactly what accounts will be affected. Once you know which ones are frozen, you should make a list to ensure you won’t neglect to change them, when the divorce is finalized.

Modify Your Will. In some states, you may not be permitted to create a new will, but your attorney should still be able to help you make the necessary changes. You’ll want to review your heirs. If you do have minor children and you have sole custody, you may want to designate another person as their guardian. If you named your spouse as executor of your will, you may want to consider changing that.

Modify Your Trust. You may have a revocable living trust, in addition to a will. One of the advantages of a revocable trust is that it doesn’t go through probate, so your heirs get a bigger inheritance more quickly. If you have a revocable trust, talk to your attorney about changing it after your divorce.

If you don’t make these changes at the time of your divorce, your assets may not go to the right beneficiaries, or your ex-spouse may end up with rights you didn’t intend.

Reference: Journal Enterprise (March 20, 2019) “5 Estate Planning Moves If You Are Getting Divorced”