Should I Buy a Vacation Home When I Retire?

Should I Buy a Vacation Home When I Retire?

Taxes, maintenance costs, insurance and potential rental-management expenses are some of the factors that can make the significant difference between a nice passive investment and a real money pit. Depending on where the home is located, the cost of ownership may need to account for property taxes, utilities, homeowners’ fees and other items.

Baron’s recent article entitled “What Retirees Should Know Before Buying a Vacation Home” says that there can be monetary benefits because a vacation home can appreciate in price over time, making it a potentially valuable asset. It also could be an income-generating enterprise, if you rent out the home.  However, you shouldn’t view a vacation home just as an investment. Remember that it’s not as liquid, so it’s not a replacement for stocks and bonds. Don’t rely on selling a vacation home for a top price, when you need the money.

First, before making a purchase, determine if you can afford a vacation home in retirement. Most retirees are living on a fixed income and may forget that the expense of a vacation home can go up faster than their income. You need to have a sufficient nest egg on which to live, so that you don’t need to make an emergency sale of the property.

Remember taxes. If you sell your second home, you can’t claim the capital-gains tax exemption that’s available when selling a primary residence. It’s only available for people who have lived in the home as a primary residence for at least two of the previous five years.

In addition to the tangible costs, if you want to keep the vacation home for the rest of your life, it will become part of your estate and subject to inheritance issues (depending on where you live). If you have children, some may want to keep the house, and others may want to sell. If there’s a split, you must find a way to give the house to those who want it and find another legacy for the others.

You could place the home into a limited liability corporation (LLC) with an operating agreement that defines it. This would allow each child to have a stake in the entity that owns the home rather than the home itself.

Whether you buy a second home for pleasure, profit, or both, think carefully before making a purchase. Ask your estate planning attorney about how to do this with your family situation.

Reference: Baron’s (Jan. 18, 2020) “What Retirees Should Know Before Buying a Vacation Home”