Is There an ADU in Your Future?

Is There an ADU in Your Future?

The idea of aging in place is something we’d all like to do. However, homes with many stairs or that are located in cold climates don’t always make this possible. One way that some families are addressing this wish to age in place: the Accessory Dwelling Unit, or ADU, according to Next Avenue in the article“Could an Accessory Dwelling Unit Help Your Aging Parent?” The flexibility—a home for mom for a few years, then used as an income-producing apartment—makes this an attractive option.

Sometimes referred to as a “granny pod,” the ADU is usually a small structure in a backyard, with little more than a bathroom, sleeping quarters and a kitchen. They are basically “tiny homes,” the very small living quarters that some people are opting for, in place of sprawling homes.

A survey by AARP found a third of adults 50 and older would be open to living in an ADU. Why not? It’s a great way to have some degree of privacy, while living near, but not with, children and grandchildren.

Communities are starting to update their zoning laws to permit the construction of ADUs, especially where housing costs are high. In Los Angeles, ADUs have been legal since 2017, when new laws about their use went into effect and the increase of ADU construction permits increased by 1,000%. Housing codes changes are being examined in many other cities, including Boston, Denver, Chicago, Denver, Seattle and Washington DC, say industry experts.

Some barriers still exist, and they may not go away quickly. One is that ADUs are not cheap, even thought they are small. Many cost $150,000 or more. Much of the cost is to hook the little house up to local utilities, as well as the cost of construction. Most lenders don’t offer ADU mortgages, so payment tends to be with cash or with a home equity line of credit. This restricts the number of people who can afford an ADU.

Local communities not behind the concept of an ADU, may be concerned about the little houses being less like a tiny home and more like a shack, having a negative impact on neighborhood looks and values. Zoning codes, even those that are changing, are strict about maintaining the structures.

If your family would benefit from an ADU, start by checking with your town’s planning or building department. If the community permits the use of ADUs, you’ll want to find local builders who have constructed ADUs before. Some builders may not be interested in what they perceive as a very small project.

As boomers grow and strive to maintain their independence, expect to see more communities embrace the use of ADUs.

Reference: Next Avenue (Jan. 2, 2019) “Could an Accessory Dwelling Unit Help Your Aging Parent?”