Tips for Seniors Who Are Moving to Assisted Living

When you are planning your move into assisted living, you can quickly get overwhelmed with the endless list of things you need to do. If you are moving out of a home where you have lived for many years, the thought of having to downsize and get rid of most of your possessions can produce anxiety. If thinking about all the work ahead of you makes you feel sad or tired, it can help to have a roadmap. Here are some organizational tips for seniors who are moving to assisted living.

You will be dealing with two situations – your current house and your new home. Each one needs a tailored game plan.

How to Minimize the Stress of Packing Up Your House

When you move from a large home to a smaller environment, the logistics dictate that everything will not fit into the new space. You will have to part with some of your items.

Rule #1 is you should be the one to decide what you keep and take with you to your new home. No one should dictate what you can have. These strategies can help:

  • Some of the bulk of your items will be a simple matter, because you will have no use for some things in assisted living. For example, since the facility will likely take care of the yard work, all the lawn and gardening equipment can go to a new home. You can save someone a lot of money, by giving them these items when they buy a house.
  • If you move to a warmer part of the country, you might not need your winter gear anymore. Donating those things can help keep someone in need from being cold and reduce how much you have to move.
  • Walk into one of your rooms and make a list of the three or four things you love the most in that room. If you only keep your favorite things, when you are in your new home, everything you see will bring you joy.

Changing how you think about the process, can make it less emotional for you. Instead of thinking about losing most of your belongings, imagine how liberating it will be when you are not tied down by so many things. Most people discover a lightness and freedom, when they get rid of the clutter and things that do not matter.

Settling into Your New Home

When you pack up at your previous house, visualize how the items you keep will fit into the new space. Make sure you hold on to the things that will make you feel comfortable and at home. Arrange your favorite things, so you can see familiar items from every angle throughout your space. With a little planning, you can recreate the feel of your old home environment. Keepsakes matter. While you do not want to be crowded by clutter or create tripping hazards, a cherished clock, photographs, books and artwork can help you feel as if you belong from the first day.

If you are planning to move to an assisted living facility, reach out to your qualified elder law attorney. They may be able to help you with government benefits and are familiar with the process of transitioning.

References:

A Place for Mom. “Moving Seniors: Settling in to Senior Care.” (accessed November 21, 2019) https://www.aplaceformom.com/planning-and-advice/articles/moving-seniors

What Estate Planning Documents Do You Need?

Wouldn’t your children be relieved to learn that you’ve done all the necessary advance planning so that if you should become incapacitated, someone has been properly appointed to help with health care and financial decisions? The Tennessean suggests that you “Give your loved ones peace of mind with legal documents” so that your spouse and your family will be able to take the necessary steps to give you the care and dignity you (and they) deserve.

Here’s a checklist of the documents that everyone should have in place:

Power of Attorney for Health Care. When you have mental capacity, you can make your own decisions. When you do not, you need someone to be appointed who knows your beliefs and wishes and has the ability to advocate for you. Ideally, you should name one person to be your agent to minimize arguments. Talk with your family to explain who has been named your power of attorney for health care, and if need be, explain why that person was chosen.

Power of Attorney for Finances. There are different kinds of POA for finances. The goal of the POA for finances is so they can make decisions on your behalf, when you become incapacitated. Some states use “springing” POA—but that may mean your family has to go through a process to prove you are incapacitated. Check with an estate planning elder law attorney in your state to see what the laws are.

Advance Directive. This describes what kind of life sustaining treatment you do or do not want if you are in a coma, are terminally ill or have dementia. You can direct whether you want CPR, tube feeding, and other life-sustaining procedures to be withheld, if your quality of life is diminished and there is no hope of improvement. This will help your family to know what you want in a time when emotions are running high.

Last Will and Testament. Have a will created, if you don’t already have one. This directs distribution of your assets to your wishes and does not leave them to the laws of your state. Not having a will means your family will have to go through many more court proceedings and people you may not want to receive your worldly possessions may get them.

Trusts. Talk with your estate planning attorney about placing assets in trust, so they are not subject to the public process of probate. Your wishes will be followed, and they will remain private.

Reference: Tennessean (Nov. 16, 2019) “Give your loved ones peace of mind with legal documents”

What If Only One Parent Is Willing to Plan?

Making matters much worse for one family, is the fact that while the mother is willing to speak with an estate planning attorney and make a plan for the future, the father won’t even discuss it. What should this family do, asks the article from nwi.com titled “Estate Planning: Can one spouse plan?”

Planning for your eventual demise and distribution of your worldly goods isn’t as much fun as planning a vacation or buying a new car. For some people, it’s too painful, even when they know that it needs to be done. There’s nothing pleasant about the idea that one day you won’t be with your loved ones.

Although contemplating the reality is unpleasant, this is a task that creates all kinds of problems for those who are left behind, if it is not done.

Unfortunately, it is not unusual for one parent to recognize the importance of having an estate plan and the other parent does not consider it to be an important task or simply refuses. In that case, the estate planning attorney can work with the spouse who is willing to go forward.

Some attorneys prefer to represent only one of the spouses, especially in a case like this. Spouses’ interests aren’t always identical, and there are situations where conflicts can arise. When a couple goes to the estate planning attorney’s office and wishes the attorney to represent both of them, sometimes the lawyer will ask for an acknowledgment that the lawyer is representing both of them as a couple. In the event that a disagreement arises or if their interests are very different, some attorneys will withdraw their representation. This is not common, but it does happen.

The estate planning lawyer usually prefers, however, to represent both spouses. Married couple’s estates tend to be intertwined, with real property jointly owned as husband and wife, or husband and husband or wife and wife. Spouses are usually named beneficiaries of life insurance and retirement accounts. Even in blended family situations, this holds true.

If the father in the situation above won’t budge, the mother should meet with the attorney and create an estate plan. The problem is, she may not be able to plan effectively for the two most common and usually the most valuable assets: their jointly owned home and retirement accounts.

If the home is owned by the spouses as “entireties property,” that is, by the couple, she can’t make changes to the title, without her spouse’s consent. One spouse cannot sever entireties property, without both spouses agreeing. Some retirement plans are also subject to the federal law ERISA, which requires a spouse’s consent to change beneficiaries to someone other than the spouse.

Even with these issues, having a plan for one spouse is better than not having any plan at all.

The only last argument that may be made to the father, is that if he does not make a plan, the laws of the state will be used, and few people actually like the idea of the state taking care of their estate.

Reference: nwi.com (Nov. 17, 2019) “Estate Planning: Can one spouse plan?”

When are You Done with Estate Planning?

A family has set up their estate plan. Two sons are already in the farming business and are thriving. Their daughter will receive the proceeds from a second-to-die life insurance policy and their considerable savings. The amounts are not equal in amount, but they are an equitable inheritance, and it seems like the couple has done its homework.

However, asks an article in The Courier, “The will is done, you’re sitting pretty—but are you?”

Estate planning is a lot like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. Like farming, it gets put together over time, piece by piece. Each piece represents something that needs to be done. For instance, a key part of the puzzle is having a last will and testament. That functions like building the outside frame of the puzzle, for those who start their puzzles by building the perimeter first. It frames the rest of your estate plan.

Other pieces are included within the will, like naming a personal representative, or executor. This is the person who is in charge of distributing your assets and making sure that the directions in your will are followed, when you pass away.

Do you have a plan for what happens when you die? For instance, if a husband dies, is there a plan for the wife to maintain the farm, or will she sell machinery and other transitory assets?

For the couple mentioned above who has the will, a transition spelled out in the will and a second-to-die policy in place to supplement the daughter’s inheritance, congratulations: they have many pieces of the puzzle in place. However, that’s not everything.

The other parts of the puzzle have to do with issues while the couple is still living. What happens if one or both are injured, or become ill? Who should take over the farming in the short or long term? Who will care for the spouse or spouses? Will they depend on each other for caretaking, or their daughter?

The number one worry for seniors is whether they have enough money to last until they die. However, by taking a portion of their savings and investing in a long-term care insurance policy, they can rest assured that they or their spouse will get the care they need—in a nursing home or at home—without burning through the family’s savings.

This piece of the estate planning puzzle—preparing for illness or disability—is often missing, and it can turn the rest of the estate plan into a pile of unattached pieces.

Speak with an estate planning attorney today to make sure your estate plan does not have any missing pieces. If you have not recently reviewed your estate plan in the last three or four years, schedule a review. Changes in the law and changes in your own life may make your old estate plan out of date and may no longer achieve the goals you had in mind.

Reference: The Courier (Sep. 4, 2019) “The will is done, you’re sitting pretty—but are you?”

American Life Expectancy Has Gone Down

The good news is, people might not need to save quite as much money for retirement as before. The bad news is the reason for that statement. The life expectancy for the US is in a decline. In fact, American life expectancy has gone down for the last three years in a row.

This undesired streak marks the first time in 100 years that the life expectancy in the U.S. has declined for three or more consecutive years. American life expectancy declined for four years in a row from 1915 to 1918. To appreciate those circumstances and put our current decline into perspective, both the worldwide epidemic of Spanish Flu and World War I occurred during those four years.

The Numbers

Life expectancy is a curious beast. You will have one life expectancy at birth and a significantly different likelihood, if you live to age 25. Surviving to age 25 increases your life expectancy, and making it to middle age extends the projections even farther.

For example, a baby born in 2016 had a life expectancy of 76 years for a male and 81 for a female. Once that baby turns 25, the estimates are 89.5 years for a female and just under 87 years for a male. People who were middle-aged in 2016 had a good chance of living beyond these years. The projections in 2016 saw a decrease of six months, compared to 2015. The lowered life expectancy projections for our country are continuing.

Factors Driving the Decline in Life Expectancy

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) suggests that, while many elements go into the calculation of life expectancy, these three issues might be responsible for some of the downward slide of the American life expectancy:

  • Increased suicide rates. Suicide in the United States has skyrocketed during the last 20 years. The suicide rate is 33 percent higher now than it was in 1999. You might attribute the increase to the Great Recession, but the most dramatic surge in numbers was in 2017, with a 3.7 percent jump. On a side note, worldwide suicide rates went down by almost 30 percent during the same time.
  • Drug overdoses. The epidemic of drug overdoses is now so massive that it is affecting national life expectancy. Within the last ten years, fatal drug overdoses increased by 72 percent. These numbers include deaths from street drugs and prescription drugs. More than 70,000 people in the U.S. died from drug overdoses in 2017. Over 47,000 of those deaths involved opioids, like heroin and prescription painkillers. Doctors today prescribe three times as many opioids as they did in 1999.
  • Liver disease. Deaths from cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases have gone through the roof during the last decade. Genetics and the heavy consumption of alcohol get much of the blame for this phenomenon.

Many other factors contribute to life expectancy. Lifestyle choices, like nutrition and activity, can help a person live a longer, healthier life. We spend more on healthcare per person than any other country. While the life expectancy in our country has decreased, the projected lifespan is still increasing in France, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Germany, albeit at a much slower rate than before.

References:

CNBC. “US Life Expectancy has been declining. Here’s why.” (accessed November 14, 2019) https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/09/us-life-expectancy-has-been-declining-heres-why.html

Financial Advisor. “U.S. Life Expectancy Now 6 Months Shorter.” (accessed November 14, 2019) https://www.fa-mag.com/news/u-s–life-expectancy-now-6-months-shorter-29781.html

Rethinking Nutrition Guidelines for Older Americans

The nutritional guidelines you may or may not have followed throughout your life could become obsolete as you get older. Those rules are for children, who have different needs than aging adults.  There are also myths we should bust about seniors and nutrition. Let’s start rethinking nutritional guidelines for older Americans.

It seems as if every few years, the food pyramid and other “rules of thumb” get questioned or turned upside down. If you do not want to feel as if you are riding on a yoyo and you want to feed your body what it needs, you can simplify the process and follow these general rules for older adults:

  • You should consume about a pound of protein for every pound you weigh. In other words, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should take in around 150 grams of protein every day. Seniors seldom get the protein they need. This can make them weaker and more susceptible to falls and fractures. You can eat protein bars, drink shakes, eat meat or dairy, or consume plant-based protein.
  • Fruit will give you energy and the same nutrients found in many vegetables. Eat fruit two or three times a day. Work it into other foods, like throwing berries on your bowl of cereal.
  • Speaking of cereal and related items like bread – go for the whole grains rather than highly processed white flour. You should not feel deprived, so give yourself permission for a decadent treat now and then, even if it does contain less-than-optimal ingredients.
  • You need at least 1,200 mg of calcium every day. Take care of those bones and feed your muscles. A strong person is less likely to get injured and more likely to bounce back from illness. Calcium can come from dairy products like milk, cheese, yogurt and kefir. If you prefer non-dairy options, you can drink calcium-enriched orange juice or other calcium-fortified products. Seafood, beans, tofu, leafy greens and dried fruit can provide calcium. Almonds, chia and poppy seeds, whey protein powder, rhubarb and figs are additional options for getting your calcium.
  • Leafy greens high in antioxidants are your friend. Shoot for two to three cups a day – that is the raw amount. When they cook down, the volume is much less. You hate kale? No problem. Find greens you enjoy. Experiment with different cooking methods. You could throw raw greens into the blender with fruit and protein powder for a yummy shake that ticks off several boxes.

Myths About Seniors and Nutrition

There is a great deal of misinformation about the nutritional needs of older adults. For example, while you might need fewer calories than you did when you were chasing toddlers around the house, you need more of some nutrients, like calcium and vitamins D and B12.

Nutrition is still important, even as you age. You should not skip meals, even if you do not have a hearty appetite. You should make sure that you drink plenty of water throughout the day. Dehydration is common among aging adults, and it can be extremely dangerous.

You might think that in your golden years, you have earned the right to eat whatever you want, but doing so can give you a lower quality of life in those precious years. Your diet will affect your physical and mental health. Popping a multivitamin will not do the trick by itself. If you want to stay healthy, alert and active, continue to make healthy eating a priority.

References:

Huffpost. “Debunked! 7 Common Senior Nutrition Myths.” (accessed November 8, 2019) https://www.huffpost.com/entry/common-senior-nutrition-myths_b_12392370

Healthline. “Top 15 Calcium-Rich Foods (Many Are Non-Dairy.” (accessed November 14, 2019) https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/15-calcium-rich-foods

For more information and other tips for seniors, click here.

 

What’s Better, A Living Trust or a Will?

Everyone knows what a last will and testament is. However, a will is not always the best way to distribute your assets, explains the Times Herald-Record in the article “Living trusts are better choice than wills.” Most people think that by having a will alone, they will make it clear who they want to receive their assets when they die. However, wills are used by the court in a proceeding called “probate,” if the only estate plan you have is a will. The court proceeding is to establish that the will is valid. Depending upon where you live, probate can take a year before assets are distributed to beneficiaries.

Certain family members must receive notifications, when a will is submitted to probate. Some people will receive notices, even if they are not mentioned in the will. This can lead to all kinds of awkward situations, especially from estranged or unknown relatives. The person who is the executor of the will is required to locate these relatives, and until they are found and notified, the probate process comes to a standstill.

There are instances where a judge will allow a legal notice to be published in a local newspaper, after valid attempts to find relatives aren’t successful. If there is a disabled beneficiary, a minor beneficiary, a relative or beneficiary who can’t be located, or a relative who has been incarcerated, the judge often appoints lawyers to represent these parties’ interests and the estate pays for the attorney’s fees.

Depending on the situation, the executor may be required to furnish a family tree, or a friend of the decedent must sign an affidavit attesting that the person never had any children.

Thinking of disinheriting a child? Anyone who is disinherited in a will, receives a notice about that and is legally permitted to contest the will. That can lead to years of expensive litigation, including discovery demands, depositions, motions and possibly a trial. Like most litigation, will contests usually end in a settlement. The disinherited relative often gets a share of the inheritance, even when the decedent didn’t want them to get anything.

For many families, a living trust is a better alternative. They also serve as disability planning, naming people who will manage the assets of the trust, in case of incapacity. They are private documents, so their information does not become public knowledge, like the details of a will.

A qualified estate planning attorney will help you determine what estate planning tools will work best to achieve your goals, while maintaining your privacy and ensuring that assets pass to heirs in a discrete manner.

Reference: Times Herald-Record (Oct. 26, 2019) “Living trusts are better choice than wills”

Estate Planning, Simplified

Estate planning attorneys hear it all the time: “My children will have to figure it out,” “Everything will go to my spouse, right?” and “It’s just not a priority right now.” But then we read about famous people who don’t plan, and the family court battles that go on for years. Regular families also have this happen. We just don’t read about it.

A useful article from The Mercury titled “Estate planning basics and an estate attorney meeting preparation” reviews the basics of estate planning and explains how following the advice of an experienced estate planning attorney can protect families from the financial and emotional pain of an estate battle.

Estate planning is not just concerned with passing property and assets along to heirs. Estate planning also concerns itself with planning for incapacity, or the inability to act or speak on one’s own behalf. This is what happens when someone becomes too ill or is injured, although we usually think of incapacity as having to do with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia.

Lacking an estate plan, all the assets you have worked to accumulate are subject to being distributed by a court-ordered executor, who likely doesn’t know you or your family. Having an estate plan in place protects you and your family.

Living Will or Advanced Directive. A living will provides directions from a patient to their doctor, concerning their wishes regarding life support. This alleviates the family from having to make a painful and permanent decision. They will know what their loved one wanted.

Springing Durable Power of Attorney. This document will allow someone you choose to make financial and legal decisions on your behalf, if you are not able to. Some attorneys prefer to use the Durable Power of Attorney, rather than the Springing POA, since the Springing event may need a physician to state that the individual has become incapacitated, and it may require the court becoming involved. Powers of attorney can be drafted to be very limited in nature (i.e., to let one single task be accomplished), or very broad, allowing the POA to handle everything on your behalf.

Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care. This lets a person you name make health care decisions for you, if you are not able to do so. The decision-making power is limited to health care only.

Should Your Health Care POA and Your Financial/Legal POA be the Same Person? Deciding who to give these powers to can be difficult. Is the person you are considering equally skilled with health care, as they are with finances? Someone who is very emotional may not be able to make health care decisions, although they may be good with money. Think carefully about your decision. Just remember it’s better that you make this decision, rather than leaving it for the court to decide.

Last Will and Testament: This is the document people think of when they think about estate planning. It is a document that allows the person to transfer specific property, after they die in the way they want. It also allows the person to name a guardian for any minor children and an executor who will be in charge of administering the estate. It is far better that you name a guardian and an executor, than having the court select someone to take on these roles.

The estate planning process will be smoother, if you spend some time speaking with your spouse and family members to discuss some of the key decisions discussed above. Talk with your loved ones about your thoughts on death and what you’d like to have happen. Think about what kind of legacy you want to leave.

Estate battles often leave families estranged during a time when they need each other most. Spend the time and resources creating an estate plan with a qualified estate planning attorney. Leaving your family intact and loving may be the best legacy of all.

Reference: The Mercury (Oct. 27, 2019) “Estate planning basics and an estate attorney meeting preparation”

Good News About Gifts

It’s worthwhile to understand the rules about taxes that might be triggered by your generosity, says Forbes in the article “How To Avoid Taxes When Giving Big-Dollar Gifts.” Did you know that you can give any one person as much as $15,000 every year, without having to pay any gift taxes? You can give any number of people up to $15,000 and they don’t even need to be relatives.

Note that if and when any gift taxes are due, it’s the giver who pays any gift taxes, and not the recipient.

Therefore, if you think the world of your next-door neighbor and give him a gift of $20,000, you only owe taxes on the $5,000 above the $15,000 limit, and that’s also if your total gift exceeds your lifetime exclusion. You don’t have to be generous with cash only. Gifts can come in the form of stock, a boat or jewelry. Just remember to keep it under $15,000, so as not to incur any gift taxes.

The $15,000 limit is per person, not per couple, so if you want to give someone $15,000 and your spouse also wants to give them a $15,000 gift, that works. You can double the gift, while still staying under the annual limit.

If your gift is going to a charitable organization—a registered 501(c)(3), you won’t owe anything in gift taxes.

In addition to this $15,000 annual cap, wealthy gift givers should just keep in mind a $11.4 million maximum that is known as the lifetime exclusion. That’s the limit in 2019, and it will rise next year. This governs all the gifting you do during your lifetime. That’s outside of the annual exclusion of $15,000.

Anything more than that in the way of gifts, and you or your estate will have to pay estate tax. The top rate for the overage is high-40%. However, you’ll have to be mighty generous to get near that limit.

Here’s what’s nice: you won’t have to pay gift taxes every single time you go over that $15,000 limit. Let’s say you give your son $50,000 in 2019. Your gift is $35,000 above the ceiling, which is taxable.  However, rather than write a check for taxes to the IRS now, you count it against the $11.4 million lifetime exclusion. You now have $11.365 remaining.

The best way to go about gifting, is to make sure that your desired gifts are working in concert with your estate plan. One reason for gifting “with warm hands” is to reduce the taxable size of the estate, but there are many other ways to do this. There are also instances when gifts need to be reported to the IRS, even if no taxes are owed on them.

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about your gifting strategy, how it works with your estate plan and what gift tax forms you do, or do not, need to file.

Reference: Forbes (October 14, 2019) “How To Avoid Taxes When Giving Big-Dollar Gifts”

How Can I Make Amendments to an Estate Plan?

If you want to make changes to your estate plan, don’t think you can just scratch out a line or two and add your initials. For most people, it’s not that simple, says the Lake County Record-Bee’s recent article “Amending estate planning documents.” If documents are not amended correctly, the resulting disappointment and costs can add up quickly.

If you live in California, for example, a trust can be amended using the method that is stated in the trust, or alternatively by using a document—but not the will—that is signed both by the settlor or the other person holding the power to revoke the trust and then delivered to the trustee. If the trust states that this method is not acceptable, then it cannot be used.

In a recent case, the deceased settlor made handwritten notes—he crossed out existing trust language and handwrote his revisions to a recently executive amendment to his trust. Then he mailed this document, along with a signed post-it note stuck on the top of the document, to his attorney, requesting that his attorney draft an amendment.

Unfortunately, he died before the new revision could be signed. His close friend, the one he wanted to be the beneficiary of the change, argued that his handwritten comments, known as “interlineations,” were as effective as if his attorney had actually completed the revision and the document had been signed properly. He further argued that the post-it note that had a signature on it, satisfied the requirement for a signature.

The court did not agree, not surprisingly. A trust document may not be changed, just by scribbling out a few lines and adding a few new lines without a signature. A post-it note signature is also not a legal document.

Had he signed and dated an attachment affirming each of his specific changes made to the trust, that might have been considered a legally binding amendment to his trust.

A better option would be going to the attorney’s office and having the documents prepared and executed.

What about changes to a will? Changing a will is done either through executing a codicil or creating and executing a new will that revokes the old will. A codicil is executed just the same way as a will: it is signed by the testator with at least two witnesses, although this varies from state to state. Your estate planning attorney will make sure that the law of your state is taken into consideration, when preparing your estate plan.

If you live in a state where handwritten or holographic wills are accepted, no witnesses are required and changes to the will can be made by the testator directly onto the original without a new signature or date. Be careful about a will like this. Even if legal, it can lead to estate challenges and family battles.

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney, if you decide that your will needs to be changed. Having the documents properly executed in a timely manner ensures that your wishes will be followed.

Reference: Lake County Record-Bee (October 5, 2019) “Amending estate planning documents.”