Are Your Powers of Attorney ‘Hot’ Enough?

Are Your Powers of Attorney ‘Hot’ Enough?

Many states, including Texas, allow people to give the agent named in their financial power of attorney what are referred to as “hot” powers, if they wish. This requires careful decision making, says the Glen Rose Reporter in an article that poses a question: “Should you add hot powers to your power of attorney?”

The “hot” powers are well-named, since they give a financial power of attorney considerable power. They allow the agent to create, amend, revoke or terminate a trust during the principal’s lifetime. The agent may also make a gift. In Texas, this is subject to the limitations under Texas Estates Code §751.032 and any special instructions, to create or change rights of survivorship, create or change a beneficiary designation and to authorize another person to exercise the authority granted under the power of attorney.

That is considerable leeway for an agent to be given during one’s lifetime.

In one case, a man decided that he wanted to give some of these “hot” powers to a power of attorney, but not all of them. Unless he made specific directions, he would be giving someone the ability to make gifts outright to individuals, to a trust, an UGMA (Uniform Gift to Minors Act) account or a qualified tuition program that meets the requirements of §529.

The attorney in this case advised the client that the gifts an agent can make, are limited to the dollar limits of the federal gift tax exclusion, or twice that, if the spouse agrees to a gift split as allowed under the Internal Revenue Code.

The gifts the agent can make are further limited to being consistent with the principal’s objectives, if the agent knows what those objectives are. However, if the agent does not know what those objectives are, he or she must still make sure the gift is aligned with the principal’s best interest, based on the value and nature of the principal’s property, foreseeable obligation and the need for maintenance.

The power of attorney in all cases needs to know what their responsibilities are, and if they are given “hot” powers, they need to be informed what those specific powers are. If the agent is someone other than a spouse or descendant, that agent may not make gifts to themselves. A spouse or descendant, however, could make gifts to themselves.

The man in this example wisely decided that while his son was very trustworthy and was going to be named his financial power of attorney, it would not be a good idea to place so much temptation in the young man’s path. Therefore, he instructed his attorney to modify the statutory form of the power of attorney, so his son is not permitted to make any gifts to himself.

Reference: Glen Rose Reporter (Jan. 3, 2019) “Should you add hot powers to your power of attorney?”